Tag: SonicWall Capture ATP

Have you been the victim of cybercrime?  If I asked you that question in 2012, you might have said, “I’m not sure.”  But in 2017, I am sure your answer is, “Yes, I’ve been victimized many times.”  That’s bad news.

I joined SonicWall in 2012 and witnessed firsthand the rise of cybercrime headlines occurring on a monthly, weekly, and now daily basis.

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When you look at the most damaging network security invasions over the last year, you see a recurring pattern: leaked government cyber tools being repurposed by cybercriminals. The compromised NSA toolset leaked by Shadow Brokers was devastating in many respects. These were highly targeted tools that many nation states wish they had the operational capacity to deploy.

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Recently, the personal information of Palo Alto High School students was published via a website that allowed students to see class rankings, grade-point averages and identification numbers. Is your school network at risk?

Know your best defense against new threats. Join SonicWall at Booth 904 at the 2017 CETPA Annual Conference on Nov.

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What Is Bad Rabbit Ransomware?

On Tuesday, Oct. 24, a new strand of ransomware named Bad Rabbit appeared in Russia and the Ukraine and spread throughout the day. It first was found after attacking Russian media outlets and large organizations in the Ukraine, and has found its way into Western Europe and the United States.

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Equifax just rolled into the history books as the victim of one of the most widespread and dangerous data breaches of all time. The breach happened on March 10, 2017, at which time the cyber criminals leveraged the critical remote code execution vulnerability CVE-2017-5638 on Apache Struts2. This attack highlights the value of an Intrusion Prevention System (IPS) and virtual patching security technologies.

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  • New SonicOS 6.5, which includes more than 50 new features, powers SonicWall’s Automated Real-Time Breach Detection and Prevention Platform and is the biggest customer-driven SonicOS release in company history
  • New NSA 2650 firewall enables threat prevention over 2.5 gigabit Ethernet wired and 802.11ac Wave 2 wireless networks, supports twice the number of DPI connections and offers 12,000 DPI SSL connections, an increase of 12X
  • New SonicWave 802.11ac Wave 2 wireless access points bring together high performance, security and management into wireless networks with innovative pricing
  • New SonicWall Cloud Analytics application expands on management and reporting capabilities to empower better, faster and smarter security decisions
  • New Secure Mobile Access OS 12.1 ensures remote workers are protected with the same level of security from any location

PRESS RELEASE – SEPTEMBER 26, 2017

SANTA CLARA, Calif.

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Last week, SonicWall hosted over fifty enthusiastic partners across 14 countries at our Asia Pacific and Japan Partner Summit. Phuket with its lush and leafy surroundings and dramatic beach sunsets proved a popular location for our APJ Partner conference. Our purpose was to clearly articulate the vision for SonicWall as we build our solutions and capabilities to fight in an era of unprecedented cyber security challenges.

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Malware never sleeps. Threat actors and criminal organizations are relentless in testing, optimizing and deploying exploit kits that target businesses and organizations across the globe. August 2017 was no different.

In fact, the month presented SonicWall’s network sandbox, Capture Advanced Threat Protection (ATP), with a few milestones.

First, the Capture ATP service celebrated its first anniversary protecting customer systems across the globe.

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Day after day, the number of users is growing on the web, and so is the number of connections. At the same time, so is the number of cyberattacks hidden by encryption. SonicWall continues to tackle the encrypted threat problem by expanding the number of SSL/TLS connections that it can inspect for ransomware.

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