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Video: Why Layered Security Matters

Understanding the benefits of certain security technology is always important. But hearing innovation explained by two cybersecurity industry icons provides the context to appreciate how it works and the importance of implementing sound defenses to survive in an ever-changing cyber war.

In this exclusive video, SonicWall President and CEO Bill Conner and CTO John Gmuender walk you through the current cyber threat landscape, explore the importance of automated real-time breach detection and prevention, and address how to mitigate today’s most modern cyberattacks. The video provides:

  • Exclusive cyberattack data for ransomware, malware, encrypted threats, web app attacks, malware attacks on non-standard ports and more
  • In-depth view into the key security layers that power automated real-time detection and prevention
  • Real-world use cases, including remote and mobile security, web application protection, traditional network security, cloud sandboxing and more
  • Detailed breakdown of the SonicWall Capture Cloud Platform

October 2018 Cyber Threat Data: Web App Attacks, Ransomware Continue Upward Trend

Throughout 2018, we’ve been sharing monthly updates on the cyber threat data recorded and analyzed by SonicWall Capture Labs, highlighting cyberattack trends and tying it back to the overall cyber threat landscape.

Now, cyber threat intelligence from the SonicWall Capture Security Center is even deeper. The tool now provides empirical data on cyberattacks against web applications. In an increasingly virtual and cloud-connected world, protecting web apps is just as critical as defending more traditional networks.

In October, the overall number of web application attacks continued to rise sharply. We tracked over 1.8 million web app attacks, more than double the volume of attacks for the same time period in 2017.

One factor influencing this is the continued growth explosion of the Internet of Things (IoT), which has added billions of connected devices online, each bringing new and unique potential for vulnerabilities and weaknesses.

While the headline-grabbing news often focuses on processor attacks like Spectre or Meltdown, companies that aren’t using security measures, like SonicWall Capture Advanced Threat Protection with Real-Time Deep Memory Inspection (RTDMI), can leave their standard applications exposed and vulnerable to cybercriminals who are always looking for a weakness.

The volume of ransomware attacks also continued its global upward trend in October. So far in 2018 we’ve seen over 286 million worldwide attacks, up 117 percent from 132 million this time last year. On an individual customer level, that’s 57 attacks per day per customer, an increase from only 14 in October last year.

The growing frequency and complexities of cyberattacks paint a dire picture for global businesses of all sizes. The good news is that by assessing your business’s cybersecurity risk, improving overall security behavior, and ensuring that you are utilizing the right cybersecurity solutions for your business, it’s possible to protect your business from most data breaches.

October Attack Data

Globally, the SonicWall Capture Threat Network, which includes more than 1 million sensors across the world, recorded the following 2018 year-to-date attack data through October 2018:

  • 9.2 billion malware attacks (44 percent increase from 2017)
  • 3.2 trillion intrusion attempts (45 percent increase)
  • 286.2 million ransomware attacks (117 percent increase)
  • 23.9 million web app attacks (113 percent increase)
  • 2.3 million encrypted threats (62 percent increase)

In October 2018 alone, the average SonicWall customer faced:

  • 1,756 malware attacks (19 percent decrease from October 2017)
  • 819,947 intrusion attempts (17 percent increase)
  • 57 ransomware attacks (311 percent increase)
  • 8,742 web app attacks (185 percent increase)
  • 152 encrypted threats (12 percent increase)
  • 12 phishing attacks each day (19 percent decrease)

SonicWall Capture Security Center

SonicWall cyber threat intelligence is available in the SonicWall Security Center, which provides a graphical view of the worldwide attacks over the last 24 hours, countries being attacked and geographic attack origins. This view illustrates the pace and speed of the cyber arms race.

The resource provides actionable cyber threat intelligence to help organizations identify the types of attacks they need to be concerned about so they can design and test their security posture ensure their networks, data, applications and customers are properly protected.

September 2018 Cyber Threat Data: Ransomware Threats Double Monthly, Encrypted Threats Still Growing

We’re into October and based on this year’s reports so far, the threat landscape is continuing to evolve and change as the global cyber arms race grows.

Phishing attacks continue to trend downwards, with September data showing the volume of attacks down 92 percent compared to the same time last year. The reasons for this decline are not 100 percent clear, but may be partly attributed to increased awareness as people are becoming more adept at identifying phony websites and sharing information about common scams.

While phishing is still a threat, particularly as the holiday season approaches, it appears that cyber criminals are continuing to favor attacks involving malware, ransomware, TLS/SSL encrypted attacks and intrusion attempts. SonicWall Capture Advanced Threat Protection sandbox, with Real-Time Deep Memory Inspection (RTDMITM), has discovered 27,680 new attack variants this year, further evidence that cyber criminals are pursuing more sophisticated and coordinated methods of attack.

Globally, the SonicWall Capture Threat Network, which includes more than 1 million sensors across the world, recorded the following 2018 year-to-date attack data through September 2018:

  • 8.5 billion malware attacks (54 percent increase from 2017)
  • 2.9 trillion intrusion attempts (49 percent increase)
  • 262.4 million ransomware attacks (108 percent increase)
  • 1.9 million encrypted threats (56 percent increase)

In September 2018 alone, the average SonicWall customer faced:

  • 1,662 malware attacks (24 percent decrease from July 2017)
  • 791,015 intrusion attempts (19 percent increase)
  • 56 ransomware attacks (99 percent increase)
  • 70.9 encrypted threats (61 percent decrease)
  • 10 phishing attacks each day (92 percent decrease)

 SonicWall Capture Security Center

SonicWall cyber threat intelligence is available in the SonicWall Security Center, which provides a graphical view of the worldwide attacks over the last 24 hours, countries being attacked and geographic attack origins. This view illustrates the pace and speed of the cyber arms race.

The resource provides actionable cyber threat intelligence to help organizations identify the types of attacks they need to be concerned about so they can design and test their security posture ensure their networks, data, applications and customers are properly protected.

Get the Mid-Year Update

Dive into the latest cybersecurity trends and threat intelligence from SonicWall Capture Labs. The mid-year update to the 2018 SonicWall Cyber Threat Report explores how quickly the cyber threat landscape has evolved in just a few months.

Ransomware Surges, Encrypted Threats Reach Record Highs in First Half of 2018

To ensure organizations are aware of the latest cybercriminal attack behavior, today SonicWall published a mid-year update to the 2018 SonicWall Cyber Threat Report.

“The cyber arms race is moving faster than ever with bigger consequences for enterprises, government agencies, educational and financial institutions, and organizations in targeted verticals,” said SonicWall CEO Bill Conner in the official announcement.

Cyber threat intelligence is a key weapon in organizations’ fight against criminal organizations within the fast-moving cyber arms race. The mid-year update outlines key cyberattack trends and real-world threat data, including:

Data for the annual SonicWall Cyber Threat Report is gathered by the SonicWall Capture Threat Network, which sources information from global devices and resources including more than 1 million security sensors in nearly 200 countries and territories.

“SonicWall has been using machine learning to collect, analyze and leverage cyber threat data since the ‘90s,” said Conner. “This commitment to innovation and emerging technology is part of the foundation that helps deliver actionable threat intelligence, security efficacy and automated real-time bread detection and prevention to our global partners and customers.”

Get the Mid-Year Update

Dive into the latest cybersecurity trends and threat intelligence from SonicWall Capture Labs. The mid-year update to the 2018 SonicWall Cyber Threat Report explores how quickly the cyber threat landscape has evolved in just a few months.

GET THE UPDATE

May 2018: Cyberattack Volume Continues to Rise, Ransomware Attempts Jump 299 Percent

The very latest cyber threat intelligence for May 2018 depicts increases in a number of attack areas, particularly when comparing against 2017 cyber threat data. Through May 2018, the SonicWall Capture Labs threat researches have recorded:

Global Cyberattacks — May 2018

  • 2 million malware attacks (64 percent year-over-year increase)
  • 9 million ransomware attacks (78 percent year-over-year increase)
  • 238,828 encrypted threats (142 percent year-over-year increase)

Global Cyberattacks — Year to Date

  • 5 billion malware attacks (128 percent increase )
  • 2 million ransomware attacks (299 percent increase)
  • 2 million encrypted threats (283 percent increase)

To put these numbers in a more practical light, it’s helpful to break them down by customer. In May 2018 alone, the average SonicWall customer faced:

  • 2,302 malware attacks (56 percent year-over-year increase)
  • 62 ransomware attacks (69 percent year-over-year increase)
  • Almost 94 encrypted threats
  • Over 14 phishing attacks per day

With each passing month, cybercriminals continue to perpetrate cyberattacks at an ever-accelerating rate. It is interesting to note that although encrypted traffic is actually down slightly when compared with last year, encrypted threats have more than doubled. This points to cybercriminals who are more aware of the efficacy of encrypting their attacks.

In addition, phishing attacks have increased by almost 40 percent since last month. To better educate your end users and follow secure email best practices, use the phishing IQ test to increase their suspicions when opening emails, particularly from unknown senders.

As the cyber war continues between threat actors and security professionals, arming your organization with the latest cyber threat intelligence is critical to implementing or improving a sound security posture. As long as vulnerabilities exist, there are threat actors working to exploit them.

Find Threat Metrics When You Need Them

Would you like to keep up-to-date on threat metrics, security news and worldwide cyberattacks? The SonicWall Security Center has all of this and more.

VISIT THE SECURITY CENTER

SonicWall CEO: ‘It’s Time to Arm Up’ Against Malware, Encrypted Attacks

You can’t fight what you can’t see.

Cliché as it may sound, cybercriminals are using organizations’ lack of network visibility as a cornerstone for their attack strategies. Savvy threat actors are encrypting their malware payloads to cloak attacks and defeat standard security controls.

At RSA Conference 2018 in San Francisco, SonicWall president and CEO Bill Conner spoke with TechRepublic about the rapidly changing cyber arms race and the need to properly detect and inspect encrypted traffic, which made up 68 percent of all web traffic in 2017 — a 24 percent year-over-year increase from 2016.

“In Q1, you see a dramatic increase in malware and ransomware. We’re also seeing a dramatic increase in SSL encryption, and encryption being used to carry malware,” Conner told TechRepublic.

As Conner discussed, the 2018 Cyber Threat Report illustrated these challenges. But the threat landscape changes rapidly. In the first quarter of 2018 alone, the average SonicWall customer faced:

  • 7,739 malware attacks (151 percent increase over Q1 2017)
  • 173 ransomware attacks (226 percent increase over Q1 2017)
  • 335 encrypted threats (403 percent increase over Q1 2017)

By investing in updated solutions, and enabling SSL/TLS inspection capabilities, organizations can have the best of both security and performance. Many next-generation firewalls — like the SonicWall NSa series, for example — include DPI-SSL capabilities. However, these critical controls aren’t always activated or implemented properly, so it’s important to confer with your cyber security vendor or managed security services provider (MSSP) that you have the ability to decrypt and inspect SSL and TLS traffic.

Guidance on stopping encrypted cyber attacks

Encrypted threats will defeat even the most robust firewall if it’s not properly using deep packet inspection of SSL and TLS, often known as DPI-SSL.

If you choose not to inspect encrypted traffic — or if your firewall is limited in its ability to do so — you are truly missing a critical value of your firewall.

It is possible for organizations to enjoy the security benefits of SSL/TLS encryption without providing a hidden tunnel for attackers.

For practical guidance on implementing SSL and TLS decryption and inspection abilities, review “Encrypted Cyber Attacks: Real Data Unveils Hidden Danger within SSL, TLS Traffic” or watch the on-demand webcast, “Technical Deep Dive on how to Defeat Encrypted Threats with SonicWall DPI-SSL Technology.”

Encrypted Cyber Attacks: Real Data Unveils Hidden Danger within SSL, TLS Traffic

Since the shocking announcement of serious Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities in early 2018, we have yet to hear of a mega-breach that would signal the start of another vicious hacking year.

Has it been luck? Are our network security defenses stronger? Or are current hacks hiding their efforts? Whatever the situation, the expectations from lessons learned in historical security events are that hacking tools will evolve and new threat vectors will emerge — year after year.

To help organizations gain confidence to make informed decisions and take calculated security actions against the latest cyber attacks, SonicWall shares its threat findings in the recently published 2018 Cyber Threat Report.

The report focuses on the ongoing battle of innovations and advancements between cybercriminals and security industries. The detailed threat information was gathered, recorded, researched and analyzed by the SonicWall Capture Labs research team so you can easily follow what’s happening in the threat landscape.

Today, we’ll underscore our observations on the good and bad of SSL/TLS-encrypted web traffic and respective encrypted threats.

The cyber battle inside encrypted traffic

For five straight years of monitoring and reporting on encrypted traffic trends, SonicWall continues to record strong growth in SSL/TLS-encrypted web connections, with a 24 percent increase over 2016. This increase accounted for 68 percent of overall web connections in 2017.

We believe the rise was attributed to the growing use of secured cloud applications and websites. Again, use of SSL/TLS encryption continues to be trending in the right direction. Companies securing websites and cloud services, to create safer web interactions, is a win for internet users and security teams.

SSL/TLS Use Increased

Despite the security advantages provided by SSL/TLS encryption, SonicWall collected real-world empirical evidence on cyber attacks executed inside of SSL/TLS-encrypted web sessions.

Using full-year data samples from a subset of SonicWall firewalls with active Deep Packet Inspection of SSL (DPI-SSL) service in 2017, we observed that an average of nearly 5 percent of all file-based malware propagation attempts used SSL/TLS encryption to avoid detection.

SonicWall Capture Labs also found, on average, 60 file-based malware propagation attempts per SonicWall firewall each day. Without the ability to inspect encrypted traffic, the typical organization would have missed over 900 file-based attacks per year hidden by SSL/TLS encryption. Remember, it takes only a single miss to create severe damage to an organization.

How to stop encrypted cyber attacks

Organizations can easily block attacks within SSL/TLS web connections. However, many have not activated existing security features — like DPI-SSL — to do so.

If you choose not to inspect encrypted traffic — or if your firewall is limited in its ability to do so — you are truly missing a critical value of your firewall.

It is possible for organizations to enjoy the security benefits of SSL/TLS encryption without providing a hidden tunnel for attackers. Here are some helpful guidelines:

  1. Understand what’s at risk. If you haven’t conducted a security audit recently, complete a comprehensive analysis to identify your risks and needs.
  2. Build a defense. Upgrade to a capable, extensible next-generation firewall (NGFW) with integrated IPS security services and DPI-SSL design that can scale performance to support future growth.
  3. Evaluate and improve. Update your security policies to defend against a broader array of threat vectors and establish multiple security defense methods to respond to both HTTP and HTTPS attacks.
  4. Create awareness. Train your staff continually to be aware of the dangers of social media, social engineering and suspicious websites and downloads, as well as various spam and phishing scams in personal and business email accounts. Start with this Phishing IQ test.
  5. Inspect digital certificates. Inform users never to accept a self-signed, non-valid certificate from unknown applications.
  6. Keep it current. Make sure all your software is up to date. This will help protect your organization from older SSL exploits that have already been neutralized.

The growth of SSL/TLS encryption can and will be a positive security trend for the global community, but it will remain a channel for malicious activity until companies recognize and address the risks.

By investing in updated solutions, and enabling SSL/TLS inspection capabilities, organizations can have the best of security and performance at the same time.

Download the 2018 SonicWall Cyber Threat Report

The cyber arms race is a challenge we face together. And it’s the core reason we’re committed to passing our findings, intelligence, analysis and research to the global public via the SonicWall 2018 Cyber Threat Report.

Why GDPR Makes it Urgent to Scan Encrypted Traffic for Data Loss

“Inspect every packet, every time.”

This has been my advice to any network admin or business owner for many years.  This is equally important in regards to encrypted traffic.  Much of the Internet has become encrypted, meaning that it can only be perused and accessed over HTTPS.  While this rightly includes traffic such as online banking and financial sites, it also now includes webmail, social media, online streaming video, music and even search engines.

While encryption of the Internet enables online privacy, it has also opened a new threat vector for hackers and criminals to hide malicious content.  If you encrypt the whole Internet, you encrypt all the threats traversing it.

The painful truth is that the vast majority of networks (including governments, international enterprises, educational, medical and consumer networks) have yet to implement a security solution capable of inspecting the encrypted traffic.  If you cannot inspect it, you can not protect it.  With over 80 percent of Internet traffic now encrypted, this has become an open pipeline for attacks.  More than 67 percent of all malware attacks are still delivered via email.  Guess what? That email is most often encrypted via HTTPS.

Inspecting encrypted traffic is paramount in preventing threats such as viruses, exploits, spyware and ransomware. Numerous articles, findings, testimonials and forensic analyses of recent breaches (such as at the IRS, OPM, JPMorgan Chase, Home Depot, Target and Equifax) focused on threat prevention. They reported that varying degrees of security had not been deployed or utilized, alerts were missed, traffic went uninspected, or updates and patches were not applied.  In some breaches, there were financial penalties for failing to protect end-user data, such as providing credit monitoring services for consumers, refunds for past services, or government-levied fines.

However, another critical reason to inspect encrypted traffic was rarely discussed. Yet, in six months, that reason will have incredible legal and financial implications that many are underestimating.  That reason is data loss.  And while organizations have sought to increase their threat prevention, only minor attention has been applied to data loss prevention (DLP).  Well, that is about to change drastically.

On May 25, 2018, the European Union General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) goes into effect.  While this is an EU regulation, it will play a tremendous role in the ways data protection is controlled worldwide.  The following is an excerpt from the GDPR:

Organizations can be fined up to 4% of annual global turnover for breaching GDPR or €20 Million. This is the maximum fine that can be imposed for the most serious infringements e.g. […] violating the core of Privacy by Design concepts[….] It is important to note that these rules apply to both controllers and processors — meaning ‘clouds’ will not be exempt from GDPR enforcement.

Pay close attention to that last line, especially if you are a cloud provider or consumer.  Any organization that hosts or processes data for citizens of an EU member country will be held accountable to this regulation. Make no mistake, countries outside of the EU, including the USA, are in the process of enacting similar legislations.

While threat prevention should always be a cornerstone in any network security architecture, data loss prevention will now be as well.  For example, one may have a decent anti-malware client and other solutions for threat prevention, but what is in place to prevent a staff member unwillingly or willingly executing an application that uploads confidential end user data like credit card numbers, address, phone numbers, or other personally identifiable information?  What is in place today to stop someone from accidentally or willingly “dragging and dropping” a PDF containing personally identifiable information (PII) to a public FTP Server, or uploading it to their personal webmail?  Remember: all of these connections are now encrypted.

Fortunately, you can easily apply data loss prevention rules on all SonicWall firewalls to inspect encrypted traffic and prevent data loss.  By leveraging incredibly powerful Deep Packet Inspection of SSL/TLS Encrypted Traffic (DPI-SSL), and applying keywords or phrases defined using Regular Express (RegEx), SonicWall firewalls are able to inspect all encrypted communications for PII in real time. Should an application, system, or employee attempt to upload PII, the SonicWall firewall can detect it, block the upload, and provide incident reporting of the event. That is how you can inspect every packet, every time. That is how you prevent the breach.

Download our “Best Practices for Stopping Encrypted Threats” to help you prevent that breach.

Black Hat USA 2017: Build Your Arsenal with SonicWall Capture – Innovate More, Fear Less

The SonicWall team is excited to be a gold level sponsor at Black Hat USA, one of the world’s leading IT security events, which opens at Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas on July 22.  Our booth number is 554 and we look forward to meeting you there. SonicWall will offer attendees information on the company’s suite of automated, real-time breach detection and prevention products and services, including the SonicWall Capture ATP cloud-based network sandbox which detects and stops ransomware, advanced persistent threats (APTs) and zero-day attacks.

What will you discover in SonicWall’s booth 554?

SonicWall enables organizations to “Innovate More and Fear Less,” giving them the ability to prevent breaches automatically, in real time. Our team at SonicWall Capture Labs has confirmed that Capture technology could detect, block, and prevent WannaCry and NotPetya using SonicWall next-gen firewalls and SonicWall Capture ATP, a multi-engine cloud sandbox. At Black Hat USA 2017, our team of experts will be in booth 554 July 26-27 to demonstrate deployment of Capture using real malware samples.

I’d also encourage you attend our theater presentation, “It Doesn’t Take Magic to Win the Cyber Arms Race,” where we’ll cover how you can stop ransomware, encrypted threats and phishing attacks from bringing down your network. Attendees at each theater presentation will be eligible to enter a raffle for a Raspberry Pi Project Board.

How does SonicWall help you Innovate More and Fear Less?

SonicWall’s booth will have four solution demo kiosks:

  • Stop ransomware
  • Prevent breaches
  • Uncover encrypted threats
  • Block phishing attacks

In addition to stopping ransomware and preventing breaches, our cyber security solutions also protect against encrypted threats and targeted email attacks. By using patented anti-phishing technologies, integrating with Capture ATP and offering powerful email authentication, SonicWall Email Security can block phishing, business email compromise (BEC) and ransomware.

An additional highlight at our Black Hat USA booth will be our SonicWall Firewall Sandwich, demonstrating a “Super Massively,” scalable network firewall architecture that enables enterprise customers to:

  • Provide scalable performance for growing data centers
  • Deliver support for up to 100+ Gbps networks to eliminate network slowdowns
  • Ensure high availability, resiliency and connectivity for every enterprise
  • Achieve best price/performance and up to 70 percent lower TCO
  • Provide visualization of all applications, users and groups traversing the firewall sandwich

And don’t forget to attend our dramatic magic show every half-hour. You can’t miss the Spider over the booth.

If you want a head start before you go to Black Hat, check out the demo our security solutions via SonicWall Live Demo.  And to keep up with us at the show, follow @SonicWall and look for the hashtag #BHUSA.

Is Your K-12 Network Ready to Innovate More? Learn How SonicWall Blocks Ransomware and Encrypted Threats at ISTE 2017

Every day our children, teachers and administrators log into the network at school. How can you ensure the data travelling across that network is secure from hidden threats and attacks such as ransomware? With SonicWall next-gen firewalls and DPI SSL inspection technology, IT administrators can find threats hidden in encrypted web traffic that cybercriminals don’t want you to discover across your K-12 network. This week at ISTE 2017, SonicWall will highlight its automated real-time breach prevention solution, how to leverage our SonicWall Security as-a-Service option, and showcase the advantages eRate offers for upgrading network security. Visit us in booth 2357 from June 26-28 at The Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center. Your K-12 school district’s security solution needs to perform with x-ray vision by inspecting encrypted traffic to block and detect ransomware attacks with SonicWall Capture ATP. Over 25 years, SonicWall has been protecting school networks around the world. St. Dominic’s School for Girls is one that has been able to innovate more with SonicWall next-gen firewalls.

“SonicWall NGFW has lived up to its promises. We feel very well protected and have not experienced any security breaches or content filtering issues.” – Harry van der Burgt, IT Manager St Dominic’s School for Girls

Let’s take a look at securing your school’s network traffic.

Over time, HTTPS has replaced HTTP as the means to secure web traffic. Along the way there have been some inflection points that have spurred on this transition such as when Google announced it would enable HTTPS search for all logged-in users who visit google.com. More recently, Google began using HTTPS as a ranking signal. Other vendors including YouTube, Twitter and Facebook have also made the switch. If you read articles on the use of Secure Sockets Layer/Transport Layer Security (SSL/TLS) encryption the latest numbers typically indicate that a little over 50% of all web traffic is now encrypted and that percentage is expected to continue growing. At SonicWall, data gathered by our Capture Threat Network shows the percentage to be a little higher, around 62%. We found that as web traffic grew throughout 2016, so did SSL/TLS encryption, from 5.3 trillion web connections in 2015 to 7.3 trillion in 2016. Like others, we also expect the use of HTTPS to increase.

Given the growing trend toward HTTPS and its use by hackers to steal information, it makes sense to have a security solution in place that can decrypt and scan SSL/TLS-encrypted traffic for threats. Not every school does, however, especially smaller ones. According to Gartner’s Magic Quadrant for Unified Threat Management (UTM) from August 2016, the research and advisory company estimates that “Less than 10% of SMB organizations decrypt HTTPS on their UTM firewall. This means that 90% of the SMB organizations relying on UTM for web security are blind to the more advanced threats that use HTTPS for transport.”

In his blog titled, “DPI-SSL: What Keeps You Up at Night?” my colleague Paul Leets states, “We must look into encrypted packets to mitigate those threats.” And he’s right. We need to be able to “see” into encrypted traffic in order to identify threats and eliminate them before they get into the network. And it needs to be done in real time. We call this automated breach prevention and it’s what our lineup of next-generation firewalls delivers. To learn more about automated breach prevention and how SonicWall next-generation firewalls decrypt SSL/TLS-encrypted traffic and scan for and eliminate threats without latency, visit the “Encrypted Threats” page on our website.

In addition to uncovering encrypted threats, K-12 schools are risk for ransomware attacks. To help protect school networks against the increasing dangers of advanced persistent threats (APTs), SonicWall Capture will be available to demo at ISTE 2017. This cloud-based sandboxing service – available on both firewalls and email security solutions – scans potentially malicious unknown files until a verdict can be reached. This solution is built on multi-layered sandboxing technologies that use both system emulation and virtualization techniques to detect more threats than competitors’ single engine solutions. Customers immediately benefit from fast response times, high security effectiveness and reduced total cost of ownership.

With the volume of cyber attacks increasing in intensity and sophistication, many of our education customers have taken advantage of SonicWall Security-as-a-Service. Our expertly trained partners deliver SonicWall next-gen firewalls to you, so your school network can benefit from the following:

  • Outsourced network security to an experienced security provider
  • Have your Security as-a-Service solution expertly configured by SonicWall-certified engineers
  • Predictable monthly service fee with no upfront costs
  • Next-gen firewall, gateway anti-malware, intrusion prevention, content filtering and Capture.

SonicWall solutions for education deliver real-time breach prevention along with secure remote access that enables your school district to realize and promise of technologically advanced learning environments. Join the team onsite at the booth 2357 including our partner, Securematics. Do more and Fear Less.