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Ransomware Surges, Encrypted Threats Reach Record Highs in First Half of 2018

To ensure organizations are aware of the latest cybercriminal attack behavior, today SonicWall published a mid-year update to the 2018 SonicWall Cyber Threat Report.

“The cyber arms race is moving faster than ever with bigger consequences for enterprises, government agencies, educational and financial institutions, and organizations in targeted verticals,” said SonicWall CEO Bill Conner in the official announcement.

Cyber threat intelligence is a key weapon in organizations’ fight against criminal organizations within the fast-moving cyber arms race. The mid-year update outlines key cyberattack trends and real-world threat data, including:

Data for the annual SonicWall Cyber Threat Report is gathered by the SonicWall Capture Threat Network, which sources information from global devices and resources including more than 1 million security sensors in nearly 200 countries and territories.

“SonicWall has been using machine learning to collect, analyze and leverage cyber threat data since the ‘90s,” said Conner. “This commitment to innovation and emerging technology is part of the foundation that helps deliver actionable threat intelligence, security efficacy and automated real-time bread detection and prevention to our global partners and customers.”

Get the Mid-Year Update

Dive into the latest cybersecurity trends and threat intelligence from SonicWall Capture Labs. The mid-year update to the 2018 SonicWall Cyber Threat Report explores how quickly the cyber threat landscape has evolved in just a few months.

GET THE UPDATE

SonicWall Wins 7 New Awards, Bringing 2018 Total to Over 30

SonicWall is proud to announce it has garnered seven awards, including three from the Network Products Guide IT World Awards, two from the Globee Awards, and one each from the PR World Awards and the CEO World Awards.

With these seven new accolades, SonicWall has earned more than 30 awards so far in 2018.

First from the Network Products Guide IT World Awards is a gold award in the ‘Firewalls’ category for the SonicWall NSA 2650 firewall. The SonicWall NSa 2650 is a next-generation firewall that delivers high-speed threat prevention over thousands of encrypted and unencrypted connections to mid-sized organizations and distributed enterprises.


SonicWall also won silver in the ‘Managed Security Services’ category for the SonicWall Global Cloud Management System, or Cloud GMS. Cloud GMS is a web-based management and reporting application that provides centralized management and high-performance reporting for the SonicWall family of firewalls.


Rounding out the three from Network Products Guide, SonicWall earned silver in the ‘Email, Security and Management’ category for SonicWall Email Security 9.1. SonicWall Email Security is a multi-layer solution dedicated to combating emerging threats. It protects organizations from outside attacks with effective virus, zombie, phishing and spam blockers, leveraging multiple threat-detection techniques.


In addition to the awards from Network Products Guide, SonicWall also garnered a silver award in the ‘PR Achievement of the Year’ category from the PR World Awards for the launch of the 2018 SonicWall Cyber Threat Report. The annual report is the go-to source for cyber threat intelligence, industry analysis and cyber security guidance for the global cyber arms race.

The launch of the 2018 SonicWall Cyber Threat Report also took home gold in the ‘Public Relations Achievement of the Year’ from the Globee Awards. The team also earned a silver in the Globee Awards in the ‘Product Management/Development Team of the Year’ for the team led by SonicWall COO Atul Dhablania.

Finally, SonicWall CEO Bill Conner won silver in the ‘CEO Excellence of the Year’ award for organizations with 500-2,499 employees.

SonicWall CEO: ‘It’s Time to Arm Up’ Against Malware, Encrypted Attacks

You can’t fight what you can’t see.

Cliché as it may sound, cybercriminals are using organizations’ lack of network visibility as a cornerstone for their attack strategies. Savvy threat actors are encrypting their malware payloads to cloak attacks and defeat standard security controls.

At RSA Conference 2018 in San Francisco, SonicWall president and CEO Bill Conner spoke with TechRepublic about the rapidly changing cyber arms race and the need to properly detect and inspect encrypted traffic, which made up 68 percent of all web traffic in 2017 — a 24 percent year-over-year increase from 2016.

“In Q1, you see a dramatic increase in malware and ransomware. We’re also seeing a dramatic increase in SSL encryption, and encryption being used to carry malware,” Conner told TechRepublic.

As Conner discussed, the 2018 Cyber Threat Report illustrated these challenges. But the threat landscape changes rapidly. In the first quarter of 2018 alone, the average SonicWall customer faced:

  • 7,739 malware attacks (151 percent increase over Q1 2017)
  • 173 ransomware attacks (226 percent increase over Q1 2017)
  • 335 encrypted threats (403 percent increase over Q1 2017)

By investing in updated solutions, and enabling SSL/TLS inspection capabilities, organizations can have the best of both security and performance. Many next-generation firewalls — like the SonicWall NSa series, for example — include DPI-SSL capabilities. However, these critical controls aren’t always activated or implemented properly, so it’s important to confer with your cyber security vendor or managed security services provider (MSSP) that you have the ability to decrypt and inspect SSL and TLS traffic.

Guidance on stopping encrypted cyber attacks

Encrypted threats will defeat even the most robust firewall if it’s not properly using deep packet inspection of SSL and TLS, often known as DPI-SSL.

If you choose not to inspect encrypted traffic — or if your firewall is limited in its ability to do so — you are truly missing a critical value of your firewall.

It is possible for organizations to enjoy the security benefits of SSL/TLS encryption without providing a hidden tunnel for attackers.

For practical guidance on implementing SSL and TLS decryption and inspection abilities, review “Encrypted Cyber Attacks: Real Data Unveils Hidden Danger within SSL, TLS Traffic” or watch the on-demand webcast, “Technical Deep Dive on how to Defeat Encrypted Threats with SonicWall DPI-SSL Technology.”

Ransomware, Variants, Snipers & Kung Fu

The 2018 SonicWall Cyber Threat Report reported a 71.2 percent decline in the number of ransomware attacks, but a 101.2 percent increase the number of ransomware variants. Let me ask you, is this good news or bad?

If this was a military battle, would you celebrate the news the enemy reduced the number of machine guns by nearly three quarters but doubled the number of snipers? Perhaps, but now you’d have to keep your head lower and stay out of sight.

2016 saw a flood of “spray-and-pray” ransomware attacks as hackers were taking advantage of soft defenses and low levels of employee awareness. In fact, in 2016 SonicWall blocked nearly 640 million ransomware attacks; that was over 1,200 ransoms not seen (or paid) each minute.

Because of this intense pressure, organizations around the globe bolstered their defenses and education efforts. Simply put, we got tired of getting beat up for our lunch money and took Kung-Fu lessons.

Attackers retool ransomware strategies

In 2017, attackers retooled with new exploits. From that, WannaCry, NotPetya and Bad Rabbit were born. Each were designed to be malware cocktails that infected a system and then move on to the rest of the network through shared drives. But these are just three of the 2,855 variants SonicWall created defenses for in 2017 alone.

With these new malware cocktails in the wild, threat actors targeted specific roles within companies through social engineering. Instead of annoying thousands of people with a small ransom with a shrinking chance they will pay, many switched to hard-hitting attacks with larger demands.

Unique Ransomware Signatures

One such instance was the city of Atlanta, where the SamSam ransomware variant affected five out of 13 city departments and shut down systems for 10 days. Fortunately, the $51,000 ransom went unpaid but the damages to systems, lost files and productivity far outweigh the demand.

How to stop ransomware attacks, avoid ransom payouts

So, what can we do in this period of the threat landscape? Employee awareness for social engineering attacks (e.g., phishing attempts) still needs to drastically improve. Strong password hygiene also needs to be in place to block attacks like SamSam that work off of guessed passwords.

From there, we need ransomware protection technology in place that stops attacks. Here are two core technologies have may not have thought of recently:

  1. Implement a network sandbox that can identify and stop unknown attacks.

    A network sandbox is an isolated environment on the firewall that runs files to monitor their behavior. SonicWall Capture Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) is a multi-engine sandbox service that holds suspicious files at the gateway until a verdict can be achieved.

    Capture ATP also features Real-Time Deep Memory InspectionTM (RTDMI). RTDMI is a memory-based malware analysis engine that catches more malware, and faster, than behavior-based sandboxing methods. It also delivers a lower false-positive rate to improve security and the end-user experience. Learn about its ability to find and block malicious PDFs and Office documents.

  2. Use advanced endpoint client security

    For years, companies deployed traditional anti-virus (AV) on their computers, which was fine when the total number of signatures they had to write and update numbered in the hundreds of thousands. Last year, SonicWall discovered 58 million new forms of malware that take time to signature and push to defense points like firewalls.

    Even if these are pushed within 24 hours, it leaves a gap that new and advanced malware can walk right through. I recommend using a next-generation anti-virus (NGAV) solution that can monitor the behavior of a system to look for malicious activities, such as the unauthorized encryption of your files. For example, SonicWall Capture Client delivers advanced malware protection and additional security synergies for SonicWall firewall users.

On top of these two new forms of technology, please follow best practices when securing and managing your networks, such as network segmentation.

Download the 2018 SonicWall Cyber Threat Report

The cyber arms race is a challenge we face together. And it’s the core reason we’re committed to passing our findings, intelligence, analysis and research to the global public via the SonicWall 2018 Cyber Threat Report.

READ THE FULL REPORT

RSA Conference 2018: SonicWall is Hot

Fresh off of April’s massive SonicWall Capture Cloud Platform launch, SonicWall has been featured in a pair of CRN articles highlighting the hottest products at RSA Conference 2018.

The SonicWall Capture Cloud Platform is lauded in CRN’s “10 Hot New Cloud Security Products Announced at RSA 2018” listing. CRN recaps the platform’s ability to integrate security, management, analytics and real-time threat intelligence across SonicWall’s portfolio of network, email, mobile and cloud security products.

Complementing that accolade, a pair of new SonicWall products were listed in the “20 Hot New Security Products Announced at RSA 2018” category. The new SonicWall NSv virtual firewall (slide 7) and SonicWall Capture Client (slide 12) endpoint protection were showcased.

SonicWall Capture Client is a unified endpoint offering with multiple protection capabilities. With a next-generation malware protection engine powered by SentinelOne, Capture Client delivers advanced threat protection techniques, such as machine learning and system rollback.

SonicWall Network Security virtual (NSv) firewalls protect all critical components of your private/public cloud environment from resource misuse attacks, cross virtual machine attacks, side channel attacks and common network-based exploits and threats. It captures traffic between virtual machines (VM) and networks for automated breach prevention and establishes access control measures for data confidentiality and ensures VMs safety and integrity.

How to Stop Fileless Malware

In 2017, SonicWall Capture Labs discovered 56 million new forms of malware from across the globe. Threat actors are constantly creating updates to known versions of malware to get past defenses that rely on identifying malware (i.e., signatures). The forms of security that stop malware and ransomware based on signatures are only effective if they can identify the strain.

Since malware authors don’t want to continually update their code and have attacks in flight fail, they often resort to creating fileless malware as a highly effective alternative.

What is fileless malware?

Fileless malware has been around for some time, but has dramatically increased in popularity the last few years. These malware leverage on-system tools such as PowerShell, macros (like in Microsoft Word and Excel), Windows Management Instrumentation or other on-system scripting functionality to propagate, execute and perform whatever tasks it was developed to perform.

The problem for the business

One of the reasons fileless malware is so powerful is that security products cannot just block the systems or software that these are utilizing. For example, if a security admin blocked PowerShell, many IT maintenance tasks would be terminated. This makes it impossible for signature-based security solutions to detect or prevent it because the low footprint and the absence of files to scan.

How can SonicWall stop fileless malware?

The key is not to look at the file but, instead, look at how it behaves when it runs on the endpoint. This is effective because although there is a large and increasing number of malware variants, they operate in very similar ways. This is similar to how we educate our children to avoid people based on behavior instead of showing them a list of mug shots every time they leave home.

SonicWall Capture Client, powered by SentinelOne, is a next-generation antivirus endpoint protection platform that uses multiple engines, including static and behavioral AI, to stop malware before, during and even after execution. It also offers the ability to roll back an endpoint to a state before the malware got on to or activated on the system.

In the face of fileless malware, the full behavioral monitoring approach is amazing at detecting and preventing this type of attack because it is agnostic to the attack vector.

How does it work?

SonicWall actively monitors all activities on the agent side at the kernel level to differentiate between malicious and benign activities. Once Capture Client detects malicious activity, it can effectively mitigate an attack and, if needed, roll back any damage, allowing the user to work on a clean device.

Conclusion

Ultimately, adversaries will always take the shortest path to compromise endpoints to ensure the highest return with the least amount of effort. Fileless malware is quickly becoming one of the most popular ways to do so. It is not enough to just block essential operations like PowerShell.

You need anti-virus software that fully monitors the behavior of a system to prevent attacks utilizing exploits, macro documents, exploit kits, PowerShell, PowerSploit and zero-days vulnerabilities locally and without dependence to network connectivity.

To learn more, download the in-depth data sheet, “SonicWall Capture Client powered by SentinelOne.”

Webinar: Stop Fileless Malware with SonicWall Capture Client

Join SonicWall and SentinelOne cyber security experts to learn how to stay safe from advanced cyber threats like fileless malware.

Cyber Security News & Trends

Each week, SonicWall collects the cyber security industry’s most compelling, trending and important interviews, media and news stories — just for you.


SonicWall Spotlight

Ransomware Tops Malicious Attack Charts  BBC

  • SonicWall President and CEO Bill Conner talks about the growing concern of ransomware attacks as numbers indicate a growing number of attacks on the UK’s SMBs.

EXCLUSIVE: Britain Facing Cyber War as Online Attacks Soar by 300%  Daily Express

  • In an exclusive interview with The Daily Express’ John Ingham, SonicWall President and CEO Bill Conner discusses the 300 percent increase in UK cyber attacks, compared to a 151 percent increase worldwide.

Cyber Security News

Imagine You’re Having a CT Scan and Malware Alters the Radiation Levels  The Register

  • As memories of last May’s WannaCry cyber attack fade, the healthcare sector and Britain’s NHS are still deep in learning.

Privacy Imported: US Weighs EU-Style Regulations to Protect Your Data    CNET

  • Congressional hearings with Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg get lawmakers talking about regulations for internet companies’ collection and use of consumer data.

Company Insiders Behind 1 in 4 Data Breaches – Study    The Register

  • From The Register’s report on the annual Verizon Threat Report.

Researchers Unearth New Malware Designed to Make ATMs Spew Out Cash  Gizmodo

  • Researchers have recently discovered a new kind of “jackpotting” malware — the sole purpose of which is forcing ATMs to spit out huge volumes of cash.

In Case You Missed It


Upcoming Events & Webinars

April 16-20
RSA Conference
San Francisco
Moscone Center
Booth 4115, North Hall

April 25
Webinar
11 a.m. PDT
Stop Fileless Malware with SonicWall Capture Client
> Register Now

Cyber Security News & Trends

Each week, SonicWall collects the cyber security industry’s most compelling, trending and important interviews, media and news stories — just for you.


Special Section: 2018 SonicWall Cyber Threat Report

‘Malware-cocktail’ cyber attacks double in one year, shocking report warns — London Evening Standard

The News: The popular UK news publication highlights the shifting behavior of malware authors examined in the 2018 SonicWall Cyber Threat Report.

Quotable: SonicWall CEO Bill Conner described the attacks as a “cyber arms race affecting every government, business, organization and individual.”

Malware Attacks Up, Ransomware Attacks Down in 2017, SonicWall Reports — eWeek

The News: eWeek offers a slideshow that visually explores findings of this year’s SonicWall Cyber Threat Report.

Quotable: “There were a lot of mixed signals in the cyber security attack landscape in 2017 …”

Ransomware decreasing in quantity but increasing in potency — SecurityBrief

The News: SecurityBrief reporter Ashton Young outlines the increase in ransomware variants.

Quotable: “The risks to business, privacy and related data grow by the day — so much so that cybersecurity is outranking some of the more traditional business risks and concerns,” says SonicWall CEO Bill Conner.


Cyber Security News

A New Mira-style Botnet is Targeting the Financial Sector  ZDNet

  • Three financial sector institutions have become the latest victims of distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks in recent months in what looks like an attack by the IoTroop botnet known to target financial firms.

Cyberattack Shows Vulnerability of Gas Pipeline Network The New York Times

  • Last week’s attack on four of the nation’s natural-gas pipeline operators that temporarily shut down computer communications with customers shines a light on the potential vulnerability of the nation’s energy system.

Iranian Hackers Breach Singapore Universities to Access Research Data — ZDNET

  • Believed to be part of last month’s attacks against global education institutions, the hackers breached 52 accounts across four Singapore universities, including NTU and NUS, to gain access to research articles.

Equifax Taps Mark Begor as CEO Following Cyber Attack That Exposed Data for 148M Consumers — USA Today

  • New Equifax CEO named. Mark Begor to lead the credit reporting giant’s bid to recover from a cyber breach that exposed the personal data of 148 million consumers.

20 suspect hackers arrested over online banking fraud ZDNet

  • On March 28, a series of arrests took place across Europe. In total, the raids resulted in the arrest of nine individuals from Romania and 11 in Italy, all of which are remanded in custody.

In Case You Missed It


Upcoming Events & Webinars

April 25
Webinar
11 A.M. PDT
Stop Fileless Malware with SonicWall Capture Client
Register Now

April 16-20
RSA Conference
San Francisco
Moscone Center
Booth 4115, North Hall

Cyber Threat Map: SonicWall Security Center Delivers Real-Time Cyber Attack Data

Cyber security professionals exist in an increasingly complex world. As the cyber threat landscape evolves, a new cyber arms race has emerged that places organizations and their security solutions in the crosshairs of a growing global criminal industry.

Cyber criminals are increasingly turning to highly effective advanced cyber weapons, such as ransomware, infostealers, IoT exploits and TLS/SSL encrypted attacks, to target organizations of all sizes around the world.

To help organizations protect their networks and sensitive data from advanced cyber attacks, SonicWall developed a next-generation Automated Real-Time Breach Detection and Prevention Platform. Over a decade ago, SonicWall Capture Labs threat researchers pioneered the use of machine learning for threat research and cyber protection.

Complementing the platform, SonicWall is unlocking the power of the SonicWall Capture Labs Threat Network data for our customers, partners and the greater industry via the modern SonicWall Security Center.

What is the SonicWall Security Center?

The SonicWall Security Center provides a graphical view of the worldwide attacks over the last 24 hours, countries being attacked and geographic attack origins. This view illustrates the pace and speed of the cyber arms race. Even more important is the actionable data found on the Capture Labs Threat Metrics pages.

Sonicwall Security Center Worldwide Attacks

On these interactive pages, cyber threat meters show telemetry data that empower you to take action to better protect your organization. For example, the dashboard below shows that worldwide malware attack attempts are up 139 percent in February 2018 over February 2017.

Sonicwall Security Center Worldwide Attacks

In this example, SonicWall Security Center threat metrics state that the number of malware attacks increased from 0.42 billion to 1.0 billion, and that the attacks are largely coming from IP addresses in the United States, followed by China. The Security Center includes regional drilldowns for North America, Europe and Asia to give deeper insight for organizations around the globe.

This level of detail is available not only for malware attacks, but also for intrusion attempts, ransomware, encrypted traffic, https encrypted malware, new threats discovered by Capture Advanced Threat Protection and spam/phishing activity.

With this tool, we aim to provide actionable cyber threat intelligence to help you identify the types of attacks you need to be concerned about so you can design and test your security posture to make sure that your organization is properly protected.

Cyber security news, trends and analysis

The final section on the SonicWall Security Center is Security News. On this page, the Capture Labs team publishes research and analysis on the latest security threats, attacks, vulnerabilities and more — as it’s happening. When the next big cyber attack occurs, this will be the go-to source for information not only for the SonicWall community, but for the greater cyber security industry as well.

Sonicwall Security Center Worldwide Attacks

SonicWall threat intelligence and cyber attack data

SonicWall uses deep-learning algorithms to analyze data, classify attacks and block known malware before it can infect a network. Unknown files are sent to Capture Advanced Threat Protection service for automated analysis using a variety of techniques, including hypervisor analysis, emulation, virtualization and our patent-pending Real-Time Deep Memory Inspection.TM

The information we obtain on unknown threats is then combined with the billions of telemetry data points that Capture Labs gathers from the million-plus firewalls, email security appliances and endpoint clients used by our customers.

 

Get the 2018 SonicWall Cyber Threat Report

The cyber arms race is a challenge we face together. And it’s the core reason we’re committed to passing our findings, intelligence, analysis and research to the global public via the SonicWall 2018 Cyber Threat Report.

2018 SonicWall Cyber Threat Report: Actionable Intelligence for the Cyber Arms Race

Make no mistake, we are in a global cyber arms race. But it can’t be won alone: we are in this together.

That is why SonicWall is passing along findings, intelligence, analysis and research from our SonicWall Capture Labs to you today in our 2018 SonicWall Cyber Threat Report. By sharing actionable intelligence, we can help level the playing field against today’s most malicious cyber criminals.

Together, we face many battlefronts: some subsiding, some ongoing, others still on the horizon. Our latest Cyber Threat Report shows us where we — and our common cyber enemies — have advanced. Plus, it offers strategic insight on how, together, we can keep the upper hand.

Security Industry Advances

Ransomware attacks are down
The Cyber Threat Report looks at why expectations of increased numbers of ransomware attacks never materialized in 2017, even with WannaCry, NotPetya and Bad Rabbit stealing the headlines. At the same time, however, data from our cloud-based, multi-engine Capture Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) sandbox noted a spike in unique ransomware variants. While the volume was lower, the attacks were more targeted, unique and difficult to stop.

SSL, TLS encryption are up
The report documents a rapid increase of HTTPS in comparison to unencrypted HTTP sessions, which is critical for the security of cloud environments/applications and websites. However, this shift has given more opportunity for cyber criminals to hide malicious payloads in encrypted sessions. Unfortunately, while effective protection exists using deep packet inspection (DPI), there is still a widespread fear of complexity and lack of awareness around the need to inspect SSL and TLS sessions to stop hidden cyber attacks.

Exploit kits are shifting targets
Since browser vendors have largely phased out Adobe Flash, new Flash Player exploits have dropped off. But the Cyber Threat Report reveals some unexpected applications that are taking its place. Organizations should continually redefine and broaden the scope of applications and related files that could present a risk. In analyzing application volume, machine-learning technology can help protect against newer attack vectors.

Law enforcement disrupting cyber crime
Arrests of key malware and exploit kit authors are making a significant dent in the scale, volume and success of cyber attacks. In response, cyber criminals are being more careful with how they conduct business. Our latest report considers shifting trends in payment methods — particularly bitcoin — as well as other forces driving shifting trends in ransomware.

Cyber Criminal Advances

Ransomware variants increase
Despite a plunge in ransomware payouts, and a significant drop in total volume of ransomware attacks year over year, SonicWall Capture Labs identified a new malware variant for every 250 unknown hits. These new variants proved to be fairly effective when utilized. The Cyber Threat Report examines whether 2017 was an outlier, or if 2018 will signify a true shift in the threat landscape.

Encryption hiding cyber attacks
While encrypting traffic is a necessary practice, it can also cloak illegal or malicious traffic. For the first time ever, the 2018 SonicWall Cyber Threat Report offers real-world data from SonicWall Capture Labs that unmasks the volume of malware and other exploits hidden in encrypted sessions. These Capture Labs findings are our first empirical data available on SSL- and TLS-based attacks.

Malware cocktails shaking things up
Cyber criminals are creating “malware cocktails” that mainly rely on preexisting code with a few minor variants. These can spread quickly and more dangerously, while avoiding detection. While no single exploit rose to the level of Angler or Neutrino in 2016, there were plenty of malware writers leveraging one another’s code and mixing them to form new malware, thus putting a strain on signature-only security controls. The Cyber Threat Report looks at trending exploit kits and how they have repurposed old code for new gains.

IoT, chips processors are emerging battlegrounds
Cyber criminals are pushing new attack techniques into advanced technology spaces, notably the Internet of Things (IoT) and chip processors. These potential vectors for cyber attack are grossly overlooked and unsecured.

The Cyber Threat Report explains how modern malware writers implement advanced techniques, including custom encryption, obfuscation and packing, as well as acting benign within sandbox environments, to allow malicious behavior to remain hidden in memory. These techniques often hide the most sophisticated weaponry, which is only exposed when run dynamically. In most cases, they’re impossible to analyze in real time using static detection techniques.

Inside the SonicWall Cyber Threat Report

You’ll find more detail on these advances by the security industry and cyber criminals in the latest 2018 SonicWall Cyber Threat Report. The report empowers you and your team with:

  • Proprietary empirical data that you will get nowhere else to help you confidently understand key cyber threat trends
  • Detailed predictions on trending threats and security solutions to help you plan and budget resources
  • Expert best practices and valuable resources to help successfully guide you forward

    Get the 2018 SonicWall Cyber Threat Report

    The cyber arms race is a challenge we face together. And it’s the core reason we’re committed to passing our findings, intelligence, analysis and research to the global public via the SonicWall 2018 Cyber Threat Report.