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Catch the Latest Malware with Capture Advanced Threat Protection

Now that Halloween is over and your coworkers are bringing in the extra candy they don’t want, let’s look back at the last quarter’s results from SonicWall Capture Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) network sandbox service. Grab the candy corn and let’s crunch some data. Note: terms in italics below are defined in the glossary at the bottom to help newbies.

63,432 new threats discovered using the network sandbox over the course of three months on customer networks.

30.6% of threats that were found through static filtering. Translation- less than a third of these threats were new to us, but not to someone among the 50+ scanners we compare against.

69.4% of threats that were found through dynamic filtering. Translation- there is nearly a 70% chance SonicWall will find new malware and develop protections against it faster than anyone else.

.16% of all  files sent to the sandbox were malicious. Translation- SonicWall can find the needle in the haystack.

72% of files were processed in under 5 seconds. Translation- Capture ATP is fast!

60% increase in the number of Capture ATP customers that sent files for analysis over the past quarter. Translation – more people supplying potential threat data gives us a wider net to catch the latest threats, making it easier to protect you. Double translation – the community helps to protect the community.

20% of all new malware were found in documents (.docx & .pdf specifically) on many days throughout the quarter. Translation – Attackers put more attention to getting you to open malicious documents. Double Translation – educate your employees to not open suspicious attachments in email or found online.

I hope this helps you understand the importance of using a network sandbox, namely Capture ATP, the winner of CRN’s Network Security Product of the Year 2016 by customer demand. To learn more please review our Tech Brief: SonicWall Capture Threat Assessment or contact us with more information.

PS – I wrote a simple glossary of sandboxing terms for you to reference in case you are new to this. If you want more terms added to this, find me on Twitter and send me a note.

Glossary of terms:

Network Sandbox: An isolated environment where suspicious code can be run to completion to see what it wants to do. If your firewall doesn’t know the file, it will be sent to the sandbox for analysis.

Block until Verdict: A feature of the Capture ATP sandboxing service that blocks a file until a determination of the file can produce a verdict. If it’s malware, the file is dropped and can’t enter the network. If it’s good, a verdict for the hash of the file is stored and, if anyone tries to upload the file to our service, that verdict will be supplied within milliseconds to the user.

Hash (AKA: cryptographic hash): A cryptographic code to identify code (e.g., malware) across the community of researchers. Instead of storing malware and comparing new files against samples, the file is converted to a hash and compared against a database of known good and bad hashes. For example, the phrase “SonicWall Capture ATP stops ransomware” translates into “13d55c187dbd760e8aef8d25754d8aacadc60d8b”.

Once a new file is encountered, hashed, and doesn’t match a known hash, it is sent to the sandbox for analysis.

Static Filtering: A way of filtering out results of a file before taking it to time-consuming dynamic analysis. SonicWall static filtering compares new files against a database of shared malware hashes from over 50 anti-virus scanners.

Dynamic Filtering: The method of processing a file to see what it wants to do. SonicWall’s dynamic processing features three engines in parallel to find the most evasive malware. We use virtualized sandboxing, hypervisor-level analysis, and full-system analysis to uncover the most difficult forms of malware, including Cerber.

Exertis and SonicWall Pave the Way for KCSiE Guidance and Safer Internet Day

Note: This is a guest blog by Dominic Ryles, Marketing Manager at Exertis Enterprise, SonicWall’s leading distributor in the United Kingdom. Exertis is committed to providing a range of channel focused services designed to enhance your current technical knowledge and expertise in the areas of IT Security, Unified Communications, Integrated Networks and Specialist Software.


The Internet is forever changing education. Opening up a world of opportunities and transforming how students learn. New technologies inspire children and young people to be creative, communicate and learn, but the Internet has a dark side, making them vulnerable with the potential to expose themselves to danger, knowingly or unknowingly.

On the 5th September 2016, the UK Government through the Department of Education (DfE) updated the Keeping Children Safe in Education (KCSiE) guidelines to include a dedicated section for online safety. This means that every school and college will need to consider and review its safeguarding policies and procedures, focusing particularly on how they protect students online. The guidance calls for effective online safeguarding mechanisms with a mandatory requirement for all schools and colleges to have an appropriate filtering and monitoring systems in place, striking a balance between safeguarding and ‘overblocking,’ and being conscious not to create unreasonable restrictions on the use of technology as part of the education process.

When we think of ‘inappropriate material’ on the internet we often think of pornographic images, or even access to illegal sites to download movies and music,  but due to the widespread access to social media and other available platforms, the Internet has become a darker place since it first opened its doors back in 1969. Physical danger from divulging too much personal information, illegal activity such as identity theft and participation in hate or cult websites can lead to cyber bullying, and radicalisation in the modern day school, thus making children and young people vulnerable.

Earlier this year, Exertis, in conjunction with SonicWall, set out on a mission to raise awareness of KCSiE through a series of online and offline activities to the channel. We first put together our comprehensive ‘Appropriate Web Filtering and Monitoring for Schools and Colleges’ guide, which to date has received an overwhelming response from our partner base. The guide provides our reseller partners with all the information they need to understand the statutory changes, and how the SonicWall and Fastvue security solutions can enable educational establishments to become compliant. Towards the latter part of 2016, we registered to support Safer Internet Day (SID) 2017, a day dedicated to raising awareness of online safety for children and young people. Already in its sixth year, Safer Internet Day is run by the UK Safer Internet Centre, a combination of three leading UK organisations: SWGfL, Childnet International and Internet Watch Foundation with one mission – to promote the safe and responsible use of technology for young people. It will be the first year both companies have supported Safer Internet Day and we have been busy raising awareness in our local community. We approached two schools; St Margaret Ward Catholic Academy and The Co-Operative Academy and commissioned them to produce a large canvas painting with the topic ‘What does the internet mean to you?’ Students and teachers from both schools will come together to create two canvas paintings depicting the good and the bad of the internet from their perspective. We have given the schools 4-weeks to complete the art project and will be revisiting both schools on Safer Internet Day, 7th February to meet with the students and teachers behind the project, provide a talk around e-Safety, and with it, hope to raise awareness of children and young becoming safe on the Internet.


About Safer Internet Centre.

The UK Safer Internet Centre are a partnership of three leading organisations: SWGfL, Childnet International and Internet Watch Foundation with one mission – to promote the safe and responsible use of technology for young people. The partnership was appointed by the European Commission as the Safer Internet Centre for the UK in January 2011 and last year reached 2.8 million children. To find out more. Please visit – https://www.saferinternet.org.uk/

About Exertis (UK) Ltd.

Exertis is one of Europe’s largest and fastest growing technology distribution and specialist service providers. We partner with 360 global technology brands and over 28,850 resellers, e-commerce operators and retailers across Europe. Our scale and knowledge, combined with our experience across the technology sector, enables us to continue innovate and deliver market leading services for our partners. To find out more, please visit our website – http://www.exertis.co.uk/

Are School-issued Mobile Devices Safe to Use on Off-campus Networks?

A few weeks ago my eldest son was given a Chromebook by his school which he brought to the house to do his homework. Before the Chromebook, he did his homework on the PC I had set him up with in his room. The nice thing about that is I have a firewall with a content (aka URL or web) filtering policy in place so I have control over the websites he can access since he’s getting to the internet through our home network. But not everyone has a firewall and/or content filtering to protect their kids from inappropriate and potentially harmful web content.

Schools providing K-12 students with mobile devices so that they can access content over the internet has grown over time as administrators, teachers and parents see the benefits of an untethered learning environment. A Project Tomorrow report indicates that almost half of the K-12 teachers surveyed said that their students have regular access to mobile devices in their classroom. Some of those devices are school-issued. However as students enter high school more prefer to use their own personal mobile device in the classroom whether it’s a laptop, Chromebook, tablet or smartphone.

In an earlier blog I wrote about five things K-12 schools should look for in a network security solution. One of those is web filtering. K-12 schools need a URL filtering policy in place that includes technology to protect students from inappropriate or harmful internet content if they want to be eligible for discounts through the government’s E-rate program, also known as the Schools and Libraries program. While most schools have a filtering policy in place to protect students when they’re in the classroom, what happens when they take that device home? Does the mobile device have some way to enforce the policy beyond the school’s network perimeter?

This leads me back to the story about my son’s Chromebook. Without some mechanism in place that blocks access to inappropriate websites when the device is outside the firewall he could take the Chromebook anywhere there is a Wi-Fi connection and have unrestricted internet access. From a parent’s point of view, depending on the student’s age that’s probably not a good thing. From the school’s perspective, administrators don’t want to be viewed as the provider of a tool that enables children to look up inappropriate videos, images or text without some form of control in place.

One solution school IT administrators use to solve the problem is to force all traffic from the device back through the school’s firewall once the device connects to the internet. The nice part about this approach is that the school can use the same policy whether the device is inside or outside the firewall perimeter. There is some downside though. Routing all traffic from every school-issued device regardless of its location back through the school network consumes valuable bandwidth which can be costly.

A unique solution SonicWall offers is our Content Filtering Client. Residing locally on the Windows, Chrome OS or Mac OS X mobile device, the client extends web filtering policy enforcement to devices used outside the firewall perimeter. Administrators can apply the same policy or a different one depending on whether the student is using the device is being used inside or outside the network. The device will also switch over to the inside policy once it reconnects to the school’s network. The combination of the Content Filtering Service and Content Filtering Client provides “inside/outside” web filtering coverage.

If you’re an IT director or administrator with responsibility for implementing network security and content filtering across the school district and would like to learn more about Dell SonicWALL Content Filtering Services and why they are an essential component of your network security strategy, read our technical white paper titled “K-12 network security: A technical deep-dive playbook.”