Increase Your Network Security and Control Through Segmentation

When you think about securing down a network using a next-generation firewall, in most cases the process immediately goes from the Internet to the local area network (LAN). This may be a good way of thinking if you only have hard wired desktop clients. However what if the network includes servers that need inbound access from the Internet or a wireless network? What steps can you take to protect a network that’s a little more sophisticated?

Let’s look at an example of a small network where the user has a few desktop clients connected to the physical LAN, wireless clients and a storage server. For this specific use case the network segmentation is set up in the following way. The LAN network has all of the desktop clients, a wireless LAN (WLAN) network for the wireless clients and a de-militarized zone (DMZ) where the storage server is connected.

From the LAN, clients are allowed to get to the Internet, but access to the other network segments is blocked. This includes the default policy to block all incoming access from the WAN or Internet.

For the wireless users, they can get to the internet but are blocked from accessing any of the other network segments. In order for the wireless users to access other network segments they must authenticate to the firewall. Once authenticated, each wireless user can gain access to the other network segments as needed. This was done to increase security from the WLAN and prevent unauthorized access to the other network segments.

Finally, on the storage server segment, the default policy is to block access to all other network segments. This is done to ensure that if the storage server was to become compromised by a vulnerability to its software it would not allow a hacker gain access or malware to spread to other network segments on the LAN or WLAN. For WAN access, all traffic is blocked, although a specific set of ports is allowed to provide the ability to automatically update the software on the storage server.

Now you may look at this and be thinking this is overkill for such a small network. However being in the security industry for the past 15 years and educating partners and customers on proper network designed I figured it would only benefit my own network security by implementing a security design that limits access between network segments.

While I’m not saying that all networks need to have this level of complexity, it is a good idea to think about network segmentation and not put all connected devices on a single segment just because it’s easy. The network segmentation will help to control traffic not only north and south, but also provide controls for traffic going east and west between network segments.

SonicWall NSA Next-Gen Firewall Series

With the SonicWall firewalls it’s possible to create a wide variety of segments using either physical or logical interfaces or the internal wireless radio if available. Once an interface is defined, you can then apply a zone classification such as LAN, DMZ, WLAN or custom, and from there apply policies to control access between the various segments and limit unauthorized access. For increased security you can also apply authentication requirements as well. To learn more about how SonicWall next-generation firewalls can help secure your network read the “Achieve Deeper Network Security and Control” white paper.

SonicWall Staff
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