Advanced Threats

There’s a general feeling that WiFi is less secure than having a wired connection to the network. It could just be our perception that a signal travelling through air is easier to intercept than one moving across a physical Ethernet cable. When a new WiFi vulnerability is uncovered such as the one in WPA2 which Belgian researchers recently made public, it gets a lot of attention.

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Equifax just rolled into the history books as the victim of one of the most widespread and dangerous data breaches of all time. The breach happened on March 10, 2017, at which time the cyber criminals leveraged the critical remote code execution vulnerability CVE-2017-5638 on Apache Struts2. This attack highlights the value of an Intrusion Prevention System (IPS) and virtual patching security technologies.

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Malware never sleeps. Threat actors and criminal organizations are relentless in testing, optimizing and deploying exploit kits that target businesses and organizations across the globe. August 2017 was no different.

In fact, the month presented SonicWall’s network sandbox, Capture Advanced Threat Protection (ATP), with a few milestones.

First, the Capture ATP service celebrated its first anniversary protecting customer systems across the globe.

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If anyone ever needs proof on how effective SonicWall Capture Labs is, look back to the WannaCry ransomware attack in May 2017, and just last week the NotPetya malware. In contrast to over 250,000 endpoints compromised in over 150 countries, SonicWall customers with active security subscriptions were largely unaffected.

Why were they unaffected?

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Updated July 6, 2017, 11:51 AM PT

When the latest massive global cyber attack first hit on June 27, the security community observed that the payload behavior closely matched Petya ransomware, which emerged back in 2016, so we initially called this a variant. However, SonicWall Capture Labs researchers confirmed that this is definitely not Petya ransomware.

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Updated June 28, 2017

As I type this, news reports continue to roll in about yet the latest massive global ransomware attack. This time, the payload appears to be a ransomware called Petya. SonicWall Capture Labs identified the original Petya variants in 2016. However, this time it appears to be delivered by Eternal Blue, one of the exploits that was leaked from the NSA back in April.

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Will you be ransomware’s next victim? Can ransomware encrypt your data and hold it hostage until you pay a ransom?

Organizations large and small across industries and around the globe are at risk of a ransomware attack. The media mostly reports attacks at large institutions, such as the Hollywood Hospital that suffered over a week offline in 2016 after a ransomware attack encrypted files and demanded ransom to decrypt the data.

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Business models always have to tackle the method of distribution, will they sell directly or through a channel of distributors or a mix of both. The same is with ransomware developers. Many are electing to take their successful code and sell it as a kit, which eliminates many risks and the hard work of distribution all the while collecting a cut of the prize.

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